Tag Archives: Travel

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Inspiro India Official

Blog | Travel

23 December 2017

Journey of a lifetime, an epic bike ride to the ‘Seven Sister States’ of India

Having completed many bike trips, here is a breakdown of Ankit Negi’s ‘North-East India Bike Trip’ from earlier this year.

 

All excited for a trip to the ‘Seven Sister States’, he wakes up early, packs his stuff and is ready to roll! He sets-up the luggage on the bikes. Since it is Day 1, organising stuff becomes a hassle. The first halt is none other than Kaziranga National Park, the roads to Kaziranga are exceptional, with few initial ghats entire stretch is in plains with good quality of roads.

 

In no time, its time for breakfast, desi style mutter paneer, paratha, omelette and a glass full of milk at a roadside dhaba!

 

Trip meter reading is approximately 250 km on the NH715.

An evening jeep safari for the National Park has already been booked. A perfect timing of the year to spot wildlife, the guide mentions spotting a full-size Royal Bengal Tiger a day before!

 

The safari is successful, he spots greater one-horned rhinos, wild elephants, several species of antelopes and deer.

 

Day 6, approximately 310 km on the odometer, Ankit bids farewell to Assam and gears up for Meghalaya. After covering about 270 odd kilometres, he finally reaches Umiam Lake around 4.30 PM. The sun was about to set over the lake.

Almost dark, we leave the lake, Shillong is only about an hour ride from the lake.

Not a normal hill town, there is traffic everywhere, some complex to one-way streets with no parking to be found anywhere

Riding across from one street to another in search for some reasonable hotels, however, Shillong proved to be pretty expensive.  A guy on a ‘Hero Impulse’ bike spots him and helps in finding a budget hotel in the expensive town.

 

Arunachal Pradesh

Arunachal Pradesh

Assam

Majuli Island, Assam

Manipur

Meghalaya

Caves of Meghalaya

Mizoram

Nagaland

Tripura

Photos by Ankit Negi

 

Travel Day 7, the odometer now reads 650 km, a long day, today Inner-Line Permits for the remaining North-East States (Mizoram, Nagaland and Arunachal Pradesh) is secured!

Now the main challenge, riding back to the Shillong city!

The Sun is down and the temperature dip is significant, riding back in a single layer of clothing with freezing hands and feet is fun too.

 

 

Travel Day 8, 710 km, next location is Cherrapunjee!

The route from Shillong to Cherrapunjee highlights the dense rain forests, amazing waterfalls of Meghalaya.

The month of March and it has already started raining here, well it’s Cherrapunjee! The hike starts, the target is to reach Nongrait Village, where lies the infamous Double Decker Living Root Bridge.

First Living bridge!

The forefathers of Khasi tribe were the original architects of living root bridges. Khasi tribe is one of the prominent tribes of Meghalaya.

 

Day 9, trip meter reading crosses 700 km, the most challenging part of the trek is to climb more than 3000 vertical stairs! This is achieved in around 2 hours, less than average time is taken, not to forget!

 

Next day, reaching the underworld, heading for some serious caving exploration. There are many caves in Meghalaya, it also has the largest cave network found in the Indian-Subcontinent.

However, Mawmluh Cave is a network of 7 km of natural underground tunnels. We climb a bit to enter the underworld. We have no idea what awaits us!

Waist height water crossings, a bit of rock climbing, crawling narrow passage to move any further as well.

And to add, there are large water holes throughout the patch, one wrong move and you’re stuck!

The day is not over yet, a visit to the tallest plunge waterfall in India, ‘Nohkalikai Falls’, Cherrapunjee.

 

Leaving for Dawki, it is famous for its boating in crystal clear waters of the Umngot river. 900 km down, he reaches Dawki in the evening and finds the place too crowded, later realising tourists from Bangladesh visit too!

 

Planning to camp on the riverside, a secluded place away from most of the tourists. Shnongpdeng around 10 km north of Dawki proves to be the perfect place for camping! A local named James takes cares of everything, homemade dinner, bonfire, starry night and the soothing sound of the river.

 

Day 14, Unakoti, Tripura which is famous for its rock structures carved on hills! Many folk stories associated with it nonetheless.

Unakoti’s name refers to the number of Gods turned into stone by the angry Shiva. i.e one less than a crore.

Allowed to pitch tents in the tea garden of Tripura, next morning is made to explore the tea gardens.

 

2280 km, somewhere in Mizoram, an interesting observation, the number of kids spotted on the entire journey.

Day 22, offroading into Mizoram makes one tired pretty quickly, and what else is required than fresh fruits to regain the energy?

 

One suggestion from everyone right from planning days was never riding after dark in Northeast India.

 

Day 24, exploring the local market of Myanmar and a beautiful local monastery! 3 days later, Nagaland, leaving for Dzukou Valley trek which is one of the scenic treks in North East India. Surprised to find a fully functional rest house at the top of the valley, it starts raining heavily, a glass of hot milk with an omelette sandwich couldn’t have been any better at that stage!

 

Majuli – largest River Island in the world, day 30!

Situated in Assam, a river island in between the mighty Brahmaputra River and the only ‘Island District’ in India.

Owing to its remote connectivity from the external world, it’s a different world out here. Rich in its cultures and old traditions, this place is gold-mine when in terms of community or culture-based tourism!

 

Travel Day 32, approximately 3700 Kms, Ziro Valley, a place where one will find a unique culture of ‘Facial Tattoos’!

 

 

 

Travel Day 35, 4250 Kms, en route the Sela Pass, Arunachal Pradesh.

Suddenly, a clicking sound, the bike loses its power, the chain has broken! This is the first mechanical issue since in 30 days of riding! The day is saved with the help of Indian army and a returning biker group.

Now is day 36, Sela Pass, Arunachal Pradesh. Icy roads, skiddy tyres and chilly winds, managed to reach the notorious Sela Pass and take shelter in the Indian Army Cafeteria as the weather turns bad!

 

Travel day 40, 4485 km down, a quick selfie from the other side of India, Bumla Border Area in China.

 

It is day 44!

Trip meter reading is exactly 5127, Ankit Negi reaches Guwahati, loads his bike on the train and catches a flight back to Mumbai. The ride has been intense and also one of the most epic journeys of his life!

 

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Inspiro India Official

Blog | Inspiration | Photography

17 December 2017

Photographer Spotlight: Kadir Khan | iiOverseas

The immense love and support from you ‘Creative Heads’ has been surreal over the past few years. Inspiro India wishes to grow with the growing creative community.
We’re continuously working to bring great content to anyone and everyone following us on various platforms.

The end of the year calls for a new fortnightly ‘Overseas Feature’ representing ‘Creative Heads’ from all over the globe.
Inspiro India brings to you the first ‘iiOverseas‘ from our very own neighbouring country, Pakistan.

 

Kadir Khan has always considered himself to be an artist, he used to draw and doodle on his notebook and still does to this date. When he was 16, he finally picked up a camera and realised how it made perfect sense to him. ‘I needed a quick way to create content and distort viewer perception in order to design artistic illusions. I had no clue what I was doing but I think that’s what made it so appealing’, says the photographer.

 

Kadir Khan // Photo by Usamah Hussain

 

A free soul, Kadir loves Portrait, Food and Fashion Photography. He believes the fancy things marketed to photographers are all tools that may or may not be necessary to execute a certain idea. Technology shouldn’t let anyone define one’s way of working neither is accepting a photography style that important. He tries to portray the free soul he reckons himself to be through his alluring images.

 

‘I’m learning every day something new and I’m quite content with what I do’, he says, more than content with the images he creates. If not photography, Khan would’ve probably become a musician, another aspect which appeals to him other than photography.

 

Kadir loves to work on ‘Portraits’. He uses a Canon Mark III or Canon Mark IV along with various prime lenses for photography. He makes use of Lightroom and Photoshop for post-processing the images.

 

He also computes his day to be slow, spent in creating art. Inspiration was derived from his fellow photographers who have taught him a lot, one of them being Usman Malkani.

 

To achieve captivating results in photography, the photographer suggests to practice and experiment a lot. Kadir Khan’s artistic spirit suggests the readers to always follow instinct and stay focused!

 

Images by ©Kadir Khan

Follow Kadir: Instagram 

 

“Inspiro India will be featuring bloggers every week irrespective of what they blog. To get featured on Inspiro India simply use ‘#iiblogger’ on Instagram ”

 

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By

Inspiro India Official

Blog | Inspiration | Travel

16 December 2017

Cancer survivor takes on an unprecedented pilgrimage to Mount Everest

The Unprecedented Pilgrimage to Mt Everest

 

Why do humans climb mountains, I have often questioned myself and have always struggled to find a reason for why one would romanticize mountains, why climb again and again and why have one on one with ‘Death Gods’?

 

It’s because the mountains never question or beg for answers.

You don’t need to prove yourself nor do you need any validation.

They are always there, standing mighty! Breathing, protecting and killing, accepting and what not!

And in ways, most of us can’t comprehend…

 

‘Listening’

 

Some would say passion takes you there, some say it’s their dream, some take it as an adventure sport.

 

Any reason is a reason valid enough for you to want to climb the tallest mountain in the world. I get asked the same question when I tell people about my journey. I still think I don’t have an answer to that. Everything just happened so fast that I still haven’t figured it out.

 

 

So let’s start from the very beginning!

A normal doctor, working in a private hospital in Delhi.

What made her climb a mountain?

 

It all started with my love for mountains when I got work in Shimla. Having survived blood cancer and chemotherapy for one year, I was completely lagging behind in my career. I had it all planned to go and work in the US and then cancer struck.

It was the worst phase of my life, bedridden for months, total loss of control and of course the brunt of treatment.

I survived it because my family was there. It’s was our fight.

And today I say it proudly, I survived what would have killed others.

 

 

I was an avid biker. Classic 350cc, the love of my life, independent brat, a rebellious kid I was all through, but soon after cancer treatment I met with a near-death accident due to my bones being weak. I almost fractured all the major bones of my body and today I carry three titanium rods from that event.

After two back to back life-changing events, what does one do to get back on track?

 

I was clueless, no plan worked out.

Shimla was the first place where I fell for the hills. Just pastime trekking helped me heal myself mentally.

Then came Leh and the opportunity to climb Mt Everest. I said ‘no’ at first go because I knew I was not physically fit to climb mountains.

Discussing over and over with colleagues they convinced me to go for the expedition to Mt Stok Kangri which is considered as the easiest peak to scale.

I was not trained in mountaineering at all and went stupidly for this. During the course, I fell sick and had to come back. But later, I was determined to climb and experience how it feels to be on the top of a mountain and to this day it’s one feeling I have not forgotten even after climbing Everest.

People usually say that how can you describe a feeling or a moment to anyone who is not there. I say you cannot describe it by words but by sharing the passion.

After this, the love affair with mountains became more strong. It’s like an addiction now.

I trained at HIM for the basics and did the advance from AMI.

After that, we went for Mt Mamostong Kangri in the Ladakh region, 6153 m. That peak was such a beauty that it just lets you go into a trance while climbing.

Next was Mt Saser Kangri 7672m and Mt Nun 7135m, both extremely challenging peaks. During these expeditions, I realised that I am a very slow CLIMBER and slow acclimatizer. I got to know how my body behaved with height and low temperatures. But is this enough for Everest I asked myself?

Being a doctor I was also responsible for the team, and being a climber I have to be responsible for myself too.

 

Until January 2017, I was not convinced with my physical fitness at all. Over a period of two months, I pushed my body, running 10 to 12 km in Leh in the winter mornings. Let me tell you not easy at all, but that was the only thing that kept me fit.  Of course a healthy high protein diet too.

Finally, the day came whence we flew to Kathmandu and that city was full of climbers from all parts of the world. And then the flight to Lukla, the most exciting flight ever. The plane actually nosedives. And then you get to see the first view of the mighty Goddess, what a feeling to see her!

 

From Lukla, it’s a 9-day trek to the base camp situated at a height of 17700 ft. 42 km of upslope and a little bit of down slope, adventurous suspension bridges, a crowd of fellow climbers, the hustle and bustle, the yaks and sherpas doing load ferrying is still fresh in my mind. Gradually you gain height and acclimatise which is getting very important. Plus you carry your own load of 20 kg all through the trek. By the time we reached Tengbouche my legs had already given up and I was seriously contemplating on quitting, but my team motivated me so much that today I am thankful to them for I wouldn’t have done the summit without them.

On reaching base camp one would find so many colourful canopies of tents that it doesn’t feel like that you are on an expedition. You interact with so many teams and climbers that they become your family for the next two months. It was an honour to meet the famous Swiss climber Ueli Stack who attained his peaceful end in the work he loved to do.

Then over next two weeks, we went for height gaining exercises to Kala Patthar and Pumori base camp, taking three steps at that height was a pain indeed.  I used to get breathless at night while sleeping and get up at 3 am to go out of the tent. One night I just saw a trail of lights in Khumbu icefall and it was just so mesmerizing that I forgot I am actually out in cold.

So first time when you cross the notorious Khumbu icefall it’s like an endless maze of walls of ice, I literally took 12 hours to cross that monster but I knew I have to cross it again and again. So there is a team called ‘Icefall Doctors’ who fix the rope and ladders across Khumbu and they are the reason one crosses Khumbu safely.

 

Base Camp, Mt. Everest

Crossing snake bend on Khumbu icefall

Climbing icefall to camp 1

Climbing Lhotse face

Camp 2, Mt. Everest

Camp 2 to Camp 3, Mt. Everest

Camp 3, Mt. Everest

Climbing Lhotse face en route Camp 3 to Camp 4, Mt. Everest

From Camp 3 to Camp 4, Mt. Everest

Camp 4, Mt. Everest

Enroute Summit, Mount Everest

So you do two to three cycles of height gain till camp 4 to adjust your body to the height and rarefied atmosphere. The cycle where I spent a night at Camp 2 at 21000 ft, I realised how hard it’s going to be. Camp 2 is like an advance base camp and in a flat space that it’s called a football ground or the silent valley.  After that, you ascend to camp 3 to 24000 ft facing a 75-degree climb and strong winds of almost 60 to 100 mph. The night at Camp 3 was sleepless. The swishing sound of oxygen cylinders the wind and the height, restlessness is all you feel. It’s painful to be at that height where you can’t even pee without being killed.

 

Camp 4 at 26000 ft is known as the death zone, it was creepy.  We faced the mighty Lhotse incline, I was facing health problems already and was sitting down at every three step using more of my oxygen. Then suddenly out of nowhere, an oxygen cylinder comes rolling down and hits one of our Sherpas in the leg and we had to bring him down with a broken leg. Such mistakes which cost you. Once you reach camp 4 and realize why it’s called death zone, you can actually feel death in the air. Bodies all black and blue with climbing gear are lying behind rocks, no one cares like it’s a common sight to see. No humanity no emotion and no respect for them. Climbers crossing over them and then leaving behind the ones dying is something haunts you for long and scares you to the core.

After coming back to base camp there was a moment I thought for what if something happens to me, will I also be a reference point for others in future just lying out there.  But then I thought I will die doing something I liked and wanted to. So why regret?

After this we did two more cycles and before final summit window had a total rest and recoup. Prayers were done to evoke the ‘Sagarmatha Goddess’ for her blessings before the climb. It was all getting surreal now.

But the weather Gods were merciless and it was the worst climbing season ever. No ropes were fixed till summit and all were getting anxious over a failed season this time. Our team left in wee hours of May 17 morning halting at Camp 2 directly. Next day we left for camp 3 and the weather got bad, 100 mph blizzard and we were stuck, but after the blizzard died out we moved on to the next camp. Ideally, camp 4 is a stopover for 6 hrs and then you leave for the summit, but again the blizzard started and we were stuck there for two days without food and depleting oxygen. Few cylinders were stolen and then half of our team had to go down and it was decided only the strongest will climb. I was a weak member but then I went against team leaders’ decision to go for it for I knew I came so far and either I die here or go back after summoning. I was foolish I think now, such impulsive decisions can cost your team members lives too, that is what I learnt. So on the night of 20th May, a team of 8 left and it was one of the hardest things I have done till now. I felt jumping off planes is easier.

 

Then after crossing the famous Hilary step, the dangerous rocky patch where an inch here or there and you freefall to darkness. I started hallucinating I thought a fellow climber wants to cross over and I let off my safety anchor and suddenly my sherpa holds my backpack and shakes me asking what the hell am I doing? I was like oh my gosh! that was so real and a slight wind would have grown me into Nepal or Tibet dead. At t50 m from the summit, I could see what I was training for all this while. It’s just there now in front of you and it took me 50 minutes to reach on top and I was blank when I got on top. There was no thought, no chattering in my brain. Complete emptiness. Then I felt the wind saying you did it and am not making it up, it really did. Then I dropped to my knees and knelt before the Goddess,  thanking her for considering me worthy of this view. Tears roll down my cheeks and freeze. I asked myself is this what you wanted? I sit there for 20 minutes looking at the 360 view and vast expanse of clouds and other peaks. It was a sight imprinted. I make a call to the base camp at 8 am exactly 13 hrs later that we have done it, feeling a relief!

A few minutes later after clicking necessary proof pictures, we start descending. The most difficult part.

 

As the descent starts, we reach camp 4 and two of my team members became snow blind and one started having frostbite in his fingers. We hardly managed to reach camp 3 as everyone was so tired that we could hardly walk. I being the leader had to make them reach safely even though I did not have one percent energy left. 72 hrs without food crushed your body, it was like walking in the desert but of snow and during daytime it’s as hit as 40 degrees. Somehow we dragged ourselves to camp 3 and had to spend another night without food. Next morning we made our slow descent to camp 2, the condition of patients was worsening and I was worried that one might lose all his fingers. I also started having frostbite in both my feet and when I took off the shoes the whole skin peeled off. Finally, a call was made to evacuate three patients and me from camp 2 to base camp by chopper. It cost me 8000 USD to sort and if it’s from camp 3 then 24000 USD which is more than the whole expedition cost for a 5 member team. Meanwhile, we heard the sad news of Indian climber passing away. All through expedition we saw dead people dying and sherpas leaving them back. So now all these bodies have become reference points. Camp 3 and camp 4 are full of human shit and pee. We have to take care of this peak before it becomes a tourist centre. I mean we are climbing to worship a Goddess but this is what we humans do there.

 

Reaching base camp was the time I realised that I am back alive with the whole team safe and no major medical problems. The three patients were sent to Delhi and rest of the team trekked back and finally, we flew to our home country.

As soon as I landed in India there was this sudden withdrawal or sadness that what now?

Even though I was busy with presentations, I was sad. I felt like I left a part of me there.

 

Understanding that it is a mountain withdrawal, I was diagnosed with anxiety and that my cancer was back in stage 1. But I was not sad about it because I felt that I did something which I would have never even dreamt of.

People often ask me how was your experience? What did you feel? How was it like on top of the world?

I am often left speechless because of that, I was at the top.

What is the point of sharing my story? Even though you have been through hell in your life you should never think that you can’t do it, it’s not about Everest, it is about your ‘mind’.

Whatever adventure you do, find a connection to it, don’t do it just because you have the time and money for it. Relate to it. Feel connected to it. I see a lot of youngsters who go for trekking without training just to get good pictures. Get educated and train well before you go for it. Any mountain can turn on you!

Summit, Mount Everest

Photos by drmkaur_

 

What did I learn from climbing?

Mountains have the magical power to heal you. I have had chronic depression and climbing mountains have been of great help. If you go into mountains and don’t come back changed then you never connected to that mountain. They are a form of God on earth and always respect them. Don’t have any ego while climbing. Respect the traditions of culture followed there.

After recovering from cancer I got addicted to adventure, I jump out of planes, I climb mountains but still am scared of water. After my accident till now, I have not ridden a bike or a car. We all have our fears to conquer. We all have the guts to do it and that’s what I do and want everyone to do it.

 

That nothing is impossible. To make your dreams reality you have to take that first step out of your comfort zone. Nothing comes easy, but then you alone have to take that step and you alone have to make that journey to live your dream. There will be many hiccups. But there will always be a way out for that.

Take chances, make mistakes, let go of the pain, that’s how you grow. Be not scared of failures. You have to fail in order to practice being brave. It’s your journey, you might get lost in the way, but you will reach your destination if you have the will. There will be the hell lot of problems in your life, how you handle them and come out alive makes you your own superhero. Climb your own Everest. Be your own Superhero!

 

As my favourite quote says, ‘A valliant coeur, rien d’impossible!’ which means, ‘For a brave heart, nothing is impossible!’

Excerpts by team member.

 

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Blog

16 December 2017

Tour-de-Thar Itinerary: 6 days of exploration in the vicinity of Rajasthan with Western Motorsports and MotoVarnan

What if someone offered you an opportunity to spend the last few days of this year with friends, old and new, riding across the beautiful back roads in the day, sitting across a warm campfire in the wilderness, singing and dancing the night away, hard to say NO! Right? Here’s the itinerary:

 

Day 1: Sunday, 24th December, Jaipur-Jodhpur 414 km.

The Day of the Living Gods. This day will see us explore the stories of the Living Gods of Rajasthan. A temple dedicated to a man and his motorcycle, a temple for a lady who jumped into her husband’s pyre and a memorial built for conservationists, all are in store. We will be staying at a Hut Resort in a village near Jodhpur.

 

Day 2: Monday, 25th December, Jodhpur Local

The Day of The Maharaja. After breakfast, we head out to explore the iconic monuments including Mehrangarh Fort, Umaid Bhawan Palace and Jaswant Thada. A casual stroll around the markets exploring the local delicacies and the day ends with a relaxed evening around a bonfire. We will be staying at a Hut Resort in a village near Jodhpur.

 

Day 3: Tuesday, 26th December, Jodhpur-WMsar 334 km.

A Million Star Day. An early morning departure to visit Mandore, a city of historical and mythological importance. Later things get spiced up as we find our way to the world famous Mathaniya chilly plantations. After a relaxed lunch, we take a 2 km offroad detour to reach WMsar a lake in midst of the Desert and our stay for the night. Stay at a Million Star accommodation and Cookout in the wild. Enjoy bonfire, photography and a wonderful company.

 

Day 4: Wednesday, 27th December, WMsar-Sam 300 km.

The Day of the Sand. Taking the lonely backroads today we enter deep into the desert till the borders stop us. After a visit to Tanot and Longewala border posts, we keep riding/driving along the International border to reach Ghotaru. Having a historic and military importance, Ghotaru Fort is a hidden gem in the vast Thar Desert. We leave our vehicles and take the camels to travel further in the desert. A campsite specially erected for us in the middle of the desert will be our stay for the night.

 

Photos by Western Motorsport

 

Day 5: Thursday, 28th December, Sam-Osian 290 km.

The Jurassic Day. We bypass the Jaisalmer city to reach Akal Wood Fossil Park to get acquainted with the Jurassic era. We take the back roads to reach the last destination of Tour de Thar, Osian. Another Million Star accommodation. We stay in a camp and share our experiences around a bonfire along with some local lip-smacking dishes. Later we sing and dance the night away to end this epic Adventure.

 

Day 6: Friday, 29th December, Osian-Jaipur 385 km.

Dasvidaniya. We say our Goodbyes and head to our respective destinations.

 

For more details, please write to asrbhagwanpura@gmail.com or
Call/WhatsApp at +91 9001012786

 

Western Motorsports & MotoVarnan

 

Also Check 5 days of exploration in the vicinity of Rajasthan with Tour-de-Thar

 

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Blog | Travel

11 December 2017

Traveller of the Week: Tanya Khanijow

Tanya Khanijow started travelling and learning photography in 2016, she started off by expressing herself through her content on social media one frame at a time.

A traveller, blogger, vlogger and content creator, she loves to travel and find her self in different places every now and then. ‘What really drives me and encourages me to keep going is a never-ending need to explore and see the world’, says Tanya.

Tanya Khanijow

 

Tanya has always liked travelling from early childhood from the time her dad got posted to a new location, courtesy Indian Army.

Through the Indian Army, she has had the opportunity to stay at some of the most pristine locations in India. ‘I’ve changed as many as nine schools. And to be honest, I loved it. It provided me with a new perspective on a place, and people when I was as young as 3-4 years. I learned early on in life, the value of travelling and change’, she says.

 

During her college days, Tanya would find herself making plans on the spur of the moment to travel to different places. She would save her monthly allowance and hustle to travel. She has travelled in local trains, public buses, rickety mountain vehicles,  the list is endless.

 

Tanya has always loved the natural environment more than the comfort and education imbibed in a classroom. With that started her tryst with travel.

Not a full-time traveller yet, she spent 2017 working as well as travelling, intending to travel full time from next year.

Also a spontaneous traveller, she doesn’t plan the destination or things to do in advance. If she sees there is free time available on her calendar, she takes seconds to decide the best place for the time and plans economically by booking cheap flight tickets, she then skims through blogs and web resources for a brief basic idea of the culture, geography and differentiating factors of the place.

5 must-visit locations according to Tanya would be, Alappuzha in Kerala. The backwaters of Kerala are beyond beautiful and one must experience village life and a little by the water lanes. ‘Try living with locals and riding on a slow-paced boat instead of a motorboat. And don’t opt for a houseboat. Houseboats are large and can only traverse in broad canals. You’ll miss out on the village life experience’, stresses the travel junkie! Her next pick would be ‘The Himalayas’, right from North to West to the East, the entire stretch of the Himalayas is beautiful and unique, she personally feels, people who have not experienced it have missed out on something so far. Right from Uttrakhand to Valley of Flowers, Roopkund Trek, treks like Kareri lake, Bhrigu lake, Parashar lake in Himachal and recently the eastern side of Himalayas in Sikkim, it has always left her awe-inspired. Next is the white salt desert of Runn of Kutch – ‘One word, WOW! It’s beautiful, unlike anything. Especially the sight of a full moon during the night against the white sand’, she says.

 

Jaisalmer, Rajasthan

enroute Udiapur

Pondicherry

Alleppey, Kerala

Manali, Himachal Pradesh

Bhrigu Lake, Himachal Pradesh

Udaipur, Rajasthan

Vashisht, Himachal Pradesh

 

Khanijow travels with a lot of camera equipment and instils everyone to have a dedicated space or compartment for everything whilst travelling. Sunscreen, mosquito repellent, paper soap, sanitizer and tissue paper are must-haves.

Battery pack, tripod, selfie stick – very useful commodities for travelling solo, especially if one is worried about running out of battery without a source of power for hours.

 

A big fan of chasing after sunrises and sunsets, she really enjoys waking up early and catching the morning action. It goes without saying, she loves travel photography and also her new found love for making videos.

 

A pretty impressive figure, 18 states have been covered by Khanijow along with a few international trips to countries such as China, USA, London, Aruba and Bhutan.

 

‘I think every lesson that I’ve learnt while travelling has been life-changing. But if I’ve to pinpoint one if you travel, you will change your life forever, for good’, is one life lesson she has learnt whilst travelling.

Words by Harpreet
Images by ©Tanya Khanijow

 

Follow Tanya:  Instagram | Youtube

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Blog | Travel

9 December 2017

5 days of exploration in the vicinity of Rajasthan with Tour-de-Thar

What if someone offered you an opportunity to spend the last few days of this year with friends, old and new, riding across the beautiful back roads in the day, sitting across a warm campfire in the wilderness, singing and dancing the night away, hard to say NO! Right?

 

Every year Tour-de-Thar lets you escape from the civilization, teaches you not to worry about anything else but the road ahead. Five days, your riding friends become your family and the wild becomes your home.

 

Tour-de-Thar every year has much more going, much exciting as you would be exploring a new side of the Thar. Tour-de-Thar routes are unconventional, untouched and riding on county back roads. All this lined up in the spirit of Tour-de-Thar to understand the artistic culture along with a host of new and exciting experiences.

A major highlight of Tour-de-Thar is the food. Instead of cooking our own food or sourcing it, we arrange for local cooks. These cooks reach the camping location ahead of us, cook and serve hot food on your arrival! Local recipes, cooked by local cooks, served in the wilderness, especially for you is pure bliss. This is the best food experience one can ask for. We have always believed in simple, rustic and authentic experiences, this is one great example of it.

A cake without icing doesn’t look appetizing. So is Tour-de-Thar, on the last night of the ride, a local band is called out. With soulful tunes being played, you start dancing to the lovely Rajasthani tunes.

 

Photo by Western Motorsport

 

Let’s sum it up for you, end of the year, five days of riding, you forget the world, a peek into the artistic world, camping, local recipe and you dance to soulful Rajasthani music.  A good way to end the year. A year, you toiled all along.

 

Come join us with Western Motorsport on Tour-de-Thar for a year ending experience of a lifetime!
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Blog | Photography

8 December 2017

Creative Head of the week: Ajay Patel

Ajay Patel, a businessman by profession, always finds time to go out and click pictures with his friends. The lensman concentrates on displaying subjects distinctively and does not believe in so called ‘neat frames’. However, he likes to follow a minimal approach while clicking pictures.

 

Ajay tries to capture soothing aesthetics of a particular subject right from random surroundings to a unique setup. Since most of his pictures are clicked and processed on an iPhone 5s, there is no behind the scenes involved. Patel also brings his observation he’d like to depict, through his pictures!

 

New places, colours, food and people inspire this aesthetic loving photographer. He uses an iPhone 5s and OnePlus smartphones for most of his images even though he does own a Canon 600D. Snapseed, Mextures, VSCO and Lightroom are some of the apps he uses for editing images.

 

Having a keen eye for aesthetics and details since childhood, Ajay Patel became a part of the community where everyone shared a similar interest. ‘What really drives me to create pictures is I think the sense of belongingness I have built over the years with my friends over Instagram’, says Patel. These friends are not just people he has met through Instagram but are also the people he ends up spending a lot of time with and around.

Words by Harpreet

 

Images by ©Ajay Patel

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Blog | Inspiration

4 December 2017

iidailyinspiration #148

Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as ‘iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#147

 

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Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

 

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#146

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Blog | Travel

4 December 2017

Traveller of the Week: Arvind Patwal

Arvind Patwal belongs to Uttarakhand and is currently living in Delhi to pursue his graduation from Delhi University. A master at street photography, he currently works as a freelance photographer.

 

Arvind loves to research different places before starting his journey. He reminisces his first trip to Barsana at the time of the Holi festival. Excited to capture amazing colourful photography, he ultimately won.

 

Arvind Patwal

 

A group traveller by heart, he does like to travel solo depending on the situation. Though not a full-time traveller, travelling has always been a passion for him, a custom he wishes to follow.

 

A must visit for all the travel lovers out there, Arvind shares his favourite destinations with us. Anandpur Sahib during ‘Holla Mohalla’, Barsana during ‘Holi’, Varanasi during ‘Dev Dipawali’, streets of Kolkata, Deserts of Jaisalmer and Varanasi to be his favourite.

 

A planned traveller, his 5 must-haves for travelling include power bank, torch, blanket, dry fruits and a swiss knife. A lover of photography, the most interesting part for the young traveller is nonetheless, clicking pictures.
Covering states such as Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Punjab and cities like Kolkata, one life lesson he has learnt through travelling is to take care of oneself and never get involved in drug addiction.

 

Jama Masjid, Delhi

Hola Mohalla, Anandpur Sahib, Punjab

Dev Deepawali, Varanasi

Jodhpur, Rajasthan

Kolkata Railway Station, West Bengal

Nigambodh Ghat, New Delhi

Pushkar, Rajasthan

Ganga Aarti, Varanasi

Varanasi

 

An interesting fragment from the street photographer’s life involves around going to Anandpur Sahib for ‘Holla Mohalla’ with a few friends. He spent 4 nights in a car and enjoyed a lot while clicking pictures on the ground, says Arvind Patwal.

Words by Harpreet
Images by ©Arvind Patwal

 

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Blog | Travel

2 December 2017

Exotic visual tour of Indian marvels | India in Pictures #002

India is a country where various dynasties have conquered and vanished through the centuries, but the beauty still remains in the form of architecture, food and people themselves!

Cultures, traditions, celebrations and manifolds of landscapes make every corner turn into a new discovery, be it a local or visitor!

Here is a series of visuals by Creative Heads from all over the country.

 

Banke Bihari Temple, Vrindavan // ©Ankit Kumar

 

Nandgaon, Uttar Pradesh // ©Mohit Tejpal

 

Dal Lake, Srinagar // ©Nissar Rafiquee

 

CST, Mumbai // ©Yash Sheth

 

Sam Dunes Jaisalmer // ©Tanvi Sharma

 

Pahalgam, Jammu & Kashmir // ©Manali Jain

 

Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh  // ©Abhishek Kumar Singh

 

Bhabha Valley, Kinnaur // ©Ashish

 

Kochi // ©Ravinder Singh

 

Munnar, Kerala // ©Rejish

 

 

Featuring series of inspiring images by Creative Heads from all over the country as ‘India in Pictures’.

 

Rules to submit for ‘India in Pictures’ here .

 

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#147

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Blog | Inspiration

1 December 2017

iidailyinspiration #147

Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as ‘iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#146

 

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Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

 

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#145

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