Tag Archives: Daily inspiration

By

Inspiro India Official

Blog | Photography

12 January 2018

Creative Head of the Week: Gitesh Gupta

Gitesh Gupta, also known as ‘Luke CG’ is a professional photographer who hails from the scenic hills of Kullu. His journey started from his engineering days with the first photograph he clicked from his brother’s camera. His fascination gave birth to a zeal to view the world through the lens of a camera. The episode made him realise the power of perspective and imagination combined with a single click!

 

Gitesh Gupta

 

For Gitesh, the premise of any concept is human emotion, which ranges from the bliss of happiness to dejection of sadness. He feels that photography is a similar journey- it is always about telling a tale through a picture and different types of software are the tools that aid the process. His work is heavily influenced by cinema. He is fond of sci-fi action, and movies that exhibit drama with excellent cinematic experience. There is a lot to learn, he says, from the nuances of such sources- about lighting, camera angle etc. He finds in it interesting visuals and concepts in motion and a great source of learning. Thus trying to implement all of it in his work, in an innovative way.

He is largely inspired by events happening in his surroundings- bustling streets, clouds-anything and everything so to say. He also draws inspiration from another artist’s work. All of it encourages him to create a definitive work of his own. Music is another important feature that adds a cherry on the top of all his hard work.

 

When asked about his post-processing, perfection at first glance, he mentions that it all depends on how one sees things. He thinks of it as a puzzle, which has to be arranged in a  perfect manner, conjoining the right pieces, which don’t make him feel scared about the process, unlike many other people.

He compares post processing to cooking- some like it spicy, some like it sweet, but an excess of flavours might upset one’s tongue. In the same way, one has to be efficient while making use of different kinds of software available due to improved technology, he adds. The Creative Head puts to use his Canon 5D Mark IV and Canon 6D cameras along with Canon 70-200mm f2.8, Canon 85mm 1.8, Canon 16-35mm f4 and Sigma Art 24-35mm f2 when it comes to picking the right lenses. Phottix Indra500 and 120cm Octabox for the lighting. 

He primarily uses Adobe Photoshop CC for editing along with Wacom Tablet on his iMac 27. He feels Pen Tablet makes life much easier by aiding a precise selection as well as blending different elements together. He also recommends people to try one for retouching.

 

A typical day in his life is indeed scenic with a life in the mountains. Gupta prefers working late at night for editing as it is more peaceful and can focus better on ideas. His daytime is spent in regular official work-queries, e-mails, phone calls etc.

His favourite subject to click is a ‘yes’ to the camera by the subject. The attraction lies in the mysterious ways the eyes try to speak. Gitesh does not have a favourite location but he desires to explore the picturesque landscapes of Iceland and New Zealand.

 

The photography mantra he shares with our readers is to “Learn+Shoot+Practice+Repeat”. The first shot, Gitesh Gupta says, is never perfect-one, one has to rigorously practice for it.

For better results, he mentions, one needs to click a good-quality picture with the camera, and the post-processing edits can add finish to it. 
His message for people struggling in the field of photography is to never search hopelessly for the answers but figure out the right questions which will finally lead you to the solution.

Words by Laveena Behl

 

Images by ©Gitesh Gupta

Follow Gitesh: Instagram | Facebook

 

Check out latest edition of Inspiro India magazine – here

 

 

Submit your work for upcoming issue of Inspiro India Magazine

 

By

Inspiro India Official

Blog | Inspiration

3 January 2018

iidailyinspiration #149

Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as ‘iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#148

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

 

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#147

Submit your work for upcoming issue of Inspiro India Magazine
By

Inspiro India Official

Blog | Inspiration | Travel

16 December 2017

Cancer survivor takes on an unprecedented pilgrimage to Mount Everest

The Unprecedented Pilgrimage to Mt Everest

 

Why do humans climb mountains, I have often questioned myself and have always struggled to find a reason for why one would romanticize mountains, why climb again and again and why have one on one with ‘Death Gods’?

 

It’s because the mountains never question or beg for answers.

You don’t need to prove yourself nor do you need any validation.

They are always there, standing mighty! Breathing, protecting and killing, accepting and what not!

And in ways, most of us can’t comprehend…

 

‘Listening’

 

Some would say passion takes you there, some say it’s their dream, some take it as an adventure sport.

 

Any reason is a reason valid enough for you to want to climb the tallest mountain in the world. I get asked the same question when I tell people about my journey. I still think I don’t have an answer to that. Everything just happened so fast that I still haven’t figured it out.

 

 

So let’s start from the very beginning!

A normal doctor, working in a private hospital in Delhi.

What made her climb a mountain?

 

It all started with my love for mountains when I got work in Shimla. Having survived blood cancer and chemotherapy for one year, I was completely lagging behind in my career. I had it all planned to go and work in the US and then cancer struck.

It was the worst phase of my life, bedridden for months, total loss of control and of course the brunt of treatment.

I survived it because my family was there. It’s was our fight.

And today I say it proudly, I survived what would have killed others.

 

 

I was an avid biker. Classic 350cc, the love of my life, independent brat, a rebellious kid I was all through, but soon after cancer treatment I met with a near-death accident due to my bones being weak. I almost fractured all the major bones of my body and today I carry three titanium rods from that event.

After two back to back life-changing events, what does one do to get back on track?

 

I was clueless, no plan worked out.

Shimla was the first place where I fell for the hills. Just pastime trekking helped me heal myself mentally.

Then came Leh and the opportunity to climb Mt Everest. I said ‘no’ at first go because I knew I was not physically fit to climb mountains.

Discussing over and over with colleagues they convinced me to go for the expedition to Mt Stok Kangri which is considered as the easiest peak to scale.

I was not trained in mountaineering at all and went stupidly for this. During the course, I fell sick and had to come back. But later, I was determined to climb and experience how it feels to be on the top of a mountain and to this day it’s one feeling I have not forgotten even after climbing Everest.

People usually say that how can you describe a feeling or a moment to anyone who is not there. I say you cannot describe it by words but by sharing the passion.

After this, the love affair with mountains became more strong. It’s like an addiction now.

I trained at HIM for the basics and did the advance from AMI.

After that, we went for Mt Mamostong Kangri in the Ladakh region, 6153 m. That peak was such a beauty that it just lets you go into a trance while climbing.

Next was Mt Saser Kangri 7672m and Mt Nun 7135m, both extremely challenging peaks. During these expeditions, I realised that I am a very slow CLIMBER and slow acclimatizer. I got to know how my body behaved with height and low temperatures. But is this enough for Everest I asked myself?

Being a doctor I was also responsible for the team, and being a climber I have to be responsible for myself too.

 

Until January 2017, I was not convinced with my physical fitness at all. Over a period of two months, I pushed my body, running 10 to 12 km in Leh in the winter mornings. Let me tell you not easy at all, but that was the only thing that kept me fit.  Of course a healthy high protein diet too.

Finally, the day came whence we flew to Kathmandu and that city was full of climbers from all parts of the world. And then the flight to Lukla, the most exciting flight ever. The plane actually nosedives. And then you get to see the first view of the mighty Goddess, what a feeling to see her!

 

From Lukla, it’s a 9-day trek to the base camp situated at a height of 17700 ft. 42 km of upslope and a little bit of down slope, adventurous suspension bridges, a crowd of fellow climbers, the hustle and bustle, the yaks and sherpas doing load ferrying is still fresh in my mind. Gradually you gain height and acclimatise which is getting very important. Plus you carry your own load of 20 kg all through the trek. By the time we reached Tengbouche my legs had already given up and I was seriously contemplating on quitting, but my team motivated me so much that today I am thankful to them for I wouldn’t have done the summit without them.

On reaching base camp one would find so many colourful canopies of tents that it doesn’t feel like that you are on an expedition. You interact with so many teams and climbers that they become your family for the next two months. It was an honour to meet the famous Swiss climber Ueli Stack who attained his peaceful end in the work he loved to do.

Then over next two weeks, we went for height gaining exercises to Kala Patthar and Pumori base camp, taking three steps at that height was a pain indeed.  I used to get breathless at night while sleeping and get up at 3 am to go out of the tent. One night I just saw a trail of lights in Khumbu icefall and it was just so mesmerizing that I forgot I am actually out in cold.

So first time when you cross the notorious Khumbu icefall it’s like an endless maze of walls of ice, I literally took 12 hours to cross that monster but I knew I have to cross it again and again. So there is a team called ‘Icefall Doctors’ who fix the rope and ladders across Khumbu and they are the reason one crosses Khumbu safely.

 

Base Camp, Mt. Everest

Crossing snake bend on Khumbu icefall

Climbing icefall to camp 1

Climbing Lhotse face

Camp 2, Mt. Everest

Camp 2 to Camp 3, Mt. Everest

Camp 3, Mt. Everest

Climbing Lhotse face en route Camp 3 to Camp 4, Mt. Everest

From Camp 3 to Camp 4, Mt. Everest

Camp 4, Mt. Everest

Enroute Summit, Mount Everest

So you do two to three cycles of height gain till camp 4 to adjust your body to the height and rarefied atmosphere. The cycle where I spent a night at Camp 2 at 21000 ft, I realised how hard it’s going to be. Camp 2 is like an advance base camp and in a flat space that it’s called a football ground or the silent valley.  After that, you ascend to camp 3 to 24000 ft facing a 75-degree climb and strong winds of almost 60 to 100 mph. The night at Camp 3 was sleepless. The swishing sound of oxygen cylinders the wind and the height, restlessness is all you feel. It’s painful to be at that height where you can’t even pee without being killed.

 

Camp 4 at 26000 ft is known as the death zone, it was creepy.  We faced the mighty Lhotse incline, I was facing health problems already and was sitting down at every three step using more of my oxygen. Then suddenly out of nowhere, an oxygen cylinder comes rolling down and hits one of our Sherpas in the leg and we had to bring him down with a broken leg. Such mistakes which cost you. Once you reach camp 4 and realize why it’s called death zone, you can actually feel death in the air. Bodies all black and blue with climbing gear are lying behind rocks, no one cares like it’s a common sight to see. No humanity no emotion and no respect for them. Climbers crossing over them and then leaving behind the ones dying is something haunts you for long and scares you to the core.

After coming back to base camp there was a moment I thought for what if something happens to me, will I also be a reference point for others in future just lying out there.  But then I thought I will die doing something I liked and wanted to. So why regret?

After this we did two more cycles and before final summit window had a total rest and recoup. Prayers were done to evoke the ‘Sagarmatha Goddess’ for her blessings before the climb. It was all getting surreal now.

But the weather Gods were merciless and it was the worst climbing season ever. No ropes were fixed till summit and all were getting anxious over a failed season this time. Our team left in wee hours of May 17 morning halting at Camp 2 directly. Next day we left for camp 3 and the weather got bad, 100 mph blizzard and we were stuck, but after the blizzard died out we moved on to the next camp. Ideally, camp 4 is a stopover for 6 hrs and then you leave for the summit, but again the blizzard started and we were stuck there for two days without food and depleting oxygen. Few cylinders were stolen and then half of our team had to go down and it was decided only the strongest will climb. I was a weak member but then I went against team leaders’ decision to go for it for I knew I came so far and either I die here or go back after summoning. I was foolish I think now, such impulsive decisions can cost your team members lives too, that is what I learnt. So on the night of 20th May, a team of 8 left and it was one of the hardest things I have done till now. I felt jumping off planes is easier.

 

Then after crossing the famous Hilary step, the dangerous rocky patch where an inch here or there and you freefall to darkness. I started hallucinating I thought a fellow climber wants to cross over and I let off my safety anchor and suddenly my sherpa holds my backpack and shakes me asking what the hell am I doing? I was like oh my gosh! that was so real and a slight wind would have grown me into Nepal or Tibet dead. At t50 m from the summit, I could see what I was training for all this while. It’s just there now in front of you and it took me 50 minutes to reach on top and I was blank when I got on top. There was no thought, no chattering in my brain. Complete emptiness. Then I felt the wind saying you did it and am not making it up, it really did. Then I dropped to my knees and knelt before the Goddess,  thanking her for considering me worthy of this view. Tears roll down my cheeks and freeze. I asked myself is this what you wanted? I sit there for 20 minutes looking at the 360 view and vast expanse of clouds and other peaks. It was a sight imprinted. I make a call to the base camp at 8 am exactly 13 hrs later that we have done it, feeling a relief!

A few minutes later after clicking necessary proof pictures, we start descending. The most difficult part.

 

As the descent starts, we reach camp 4 and two of my team members became snow blind and one started having frostbite in his fingers. We hardly managed to reach camp 3 as everyone was so tired that we could hardly walk. I being the leader had to make them reach safely even though I did not have one percent energy left. 72 hrs without food crushed your body, it was like walking in the desert but of snow and during daytime it’s as hit as 40 degrees. Somehow we dragged ourselves to camp 3 and had to spend another night without food. Next morning we made our slow descent to camp 2, the condition of patients was worsening and I was worried that one might lose all his fingers. I also started having frostbite in both my feet and when I took off the shoes the whole skin peeled off. Finally, a call was made to evacuate three patients and me from camp 2 to base camp by chopper. It cost me 8000 USD to sort and if it’s from camp 3 then 24000 USD which is more than the whole expedition cost for a 5 member team. Meanwhile, we heard the sad news of Indian climber passing away. All through expedition we saw dead people dying and sherpas leaving them back. So now all these bodies have become reference points. Camp 3 and camp 4 are full of human shit and pee. We have to take care of this peak before it becomes a tourist centre. I mean we are climbing to worship a Goddess but this is what we humans do there.

 

Reaching base camp was the time I realised that I am back alive with the whole team safe and no major medical problems. The three patients were sent to Delhi and rest of the team trekked back and finally, we flew to our home country.

As soon as I landed in India there was this sudden withdrawal or sadness that what now?

Even though I was busy with presentations, I was sad. I felt like I left a part of me there.

 

Understanding that it is a mountain withdrawal, I was diagnosed with anxiety and that my cancer was back in stage 1. But I was not sad about it because I felt that I did something which I would have never even dreamt of.

People often ask me how was your experience? What did you feel? How was it like on top of the world?

I am often left speechless because of that, I was at the top.

What is the point of sharing my story? Even though you have been through hell in your life you should never think that you can’t do it, it’s not about Everest, it is about your ‘mind’.

Whatever adventure you do, find a connection to it, don’t do it just because you have the time and money for it. Relate to it. Feel connected to it. I see a lot of youngsters who go for trekking without training just to get good pictures. Get educated and train well before you go for it. Any mountain can turn on you!

Summit, Mount Everest

Photos by drmkaur_

 

What did I learn from climbing?

Mountains have the magical power to heal you. I have had chronic depression and climbing mountains have been of great help. If you go into mountains and don’t come back changed then you never connected to that mountain. They are a form of God on earth and always respect them. Don’t have any ego while climbing. Respect the traditions of culture followed there.

After recovering from cancer I got addicted to adventure, I jump out of planes, I climb mountains but still am scared of water. After my accident till now, I have not ridden a bike or a car. We all have our fears to conquer. We all have the guts to do it and that’s what I do and want everyone to do it.

 

That nothing is impossible. To make your dreams reality you have to take that first step out of your comfort zone. Nothing comes easy, but then you alone have to take that step and you alone have to make that journey to live your dream. There will be many hiccups. But there will always be a way out for that.

Take chances, make mistakes, let go of the pain, that’s how you grow. Be not scared of failures. You have to fail in order to practice being brave. It’s your journey, you might get lost in the way, but you will reach your destination if you have the will. There will be the hell lot of problems in your life, how you handle them and come out alive makes you your own superhero. Climb your own Everest. Be your own Superhero!

 

As my favourite quote says, ‘A valliant coeur, rien d’impossible!’ which means, ‘For a brave heart, nothing is impossible!’

Excerpts by team member.

 

Check out latest edition of Inspiro India magazine – Download Free.

 

 

Submit your work for upcoming issue of Inspiro India Magazine
By

Inspiro India Official

Art | Blog

15 December 2017

Creative Head of the week: Aaditya Singh

Aaditya Singh realised that art was his calling due to his mother who is an oil paint artist. Choosing to become an artist was never decided but he used to sketch whenever he got time whilst grade 8 to 10. He then quit sketching since he had to focus on his studies. Come April 2015, while he was preparing for his MBA entrance exams he started sketching once more. Drawing was a way to escape the numbers in quant! He used to study and attend classes in the morning/afternoon and used to sketch late at night. He focused on creating realism portraits as he had always been fascinated with human facial features. He adored the fact that even a small difference here and there could change the way one looks and not only that, but how different the same person would look depending on the way and angle the light fell on the face. Once he began sketching, he strived to become better at it by practising every day.

 

His approach was straightforward. He already had a Pinterest page where he kept a board with photographs of different individuals/models. Whenever he started sketching he picked up pictures from there and began drawing different facial features like eyes, nose, lips and hair. From there he started the process of getting all the facial features to look as realistic as possible. It was difficult in the beginning but constant practising evolved his skills. The challenge he faced, and still sometimes faces is that he just doesn’t like to sit at one place for long. Getting distracted quickly was a habit that has stayed with him even today. Apart from that whenever he sketched he kept either an anime, movie or a random documentary on YouTube playing, plus either games or any social media page on his phone. As a result, any sketch that should take one hour took three. This became a serious challenge when he began accepting commissions and had deadlines and even today he is working to fix this.

 

According to him, art, be it visual, audio or appealing to any other sense, must create some meaning to the one experiencing it. That’s how one generates value out of any experience, right? And what works for one may not necessarily work for all. He has never been able to understand abstract art. Never did, still doesn’t. But there are people willing to pay millions for it (art by Jackson Pollock for example). So visual art to him is anything that makes complete sense to the one experiencing it, as a viewer, and can connect to it. Everyone pays for any art that they see or experience either through monetary means or time. If the visual art creates value for a person, then it is an experience worth that expenditure.

 

To explain his style to someone who has never seen his work, Singh tries to create something on a piece of blank paper, by either using pencils or colours, what the human eyes see. Though he mostly tries creating realistic human portraits, he is known to dab the brush in the paint to bring the night sky on a canvas from time to time.

 

He started sketching seriously in 2015. It was meant to be something that would help him calm down and distract his mind from all the math he had to study every day. He started taking it as something more than a hobby or something that he did just for himself which was the case when he began getting requests to make portraits of people from Facebook. The most amazing part, he had not even met those people! That was when he understood that art can be something more than just a hobby.

 

Aaditya does not have any Art-related study background. It was sheer practice every single day that helped him improve. He experimented using different techniques (studied the portraits created by other artists on Instagram) and tried to integrate what he learnt from observing them into his sketches.

 

According to him, his will to keep improving by the passing day is his greatest strength. He believes that It takes a lot of patience. He says that when one makes sketches, not every single one of them turns out the way one wanted, especially when they are working with watercolours. He has torn and thrown away more pieces than he can remember, but still those pieces only helped him understand what he could have done better and made sure that he didn’t repeat the same mistakes again.

 

Being a volunteer at Ahimsa which is an NGO for stray animals in Mumbai, he showcases his love for animals and wildlife. Apart from that, he loves to cook food and likes experimenting in the kitchen just like with his art. His love for music can never be lessened as it is something that helps him sleep better at night. He even writes lyrics, poems and loves to take a dip in a pool or simply swim. He feels that he is only one dive away from becoming a certified scuba diver! A few things that keep him busy when he is not drawing.

 

He feels the need to have his own space when he is working. One of the reasons why he sketches post-midnight is because he doesn’t like to sleep much so these are the hours he utilises to create some realistic drawings. He studies the photographs that he is about to draw before he even touches any tools. The first step is to understand which features require focus, what parts will take and which areas he is most likely to mess up. Once he is done with that he picks up his tools and starts drawing. 
The tools he uses are graphite, pencil (Mars Lumograph series), black and white ink (Copic), watercolours (Camel Artists’ watercolours), watercolour pencil (Luna Aquarelle) and sheets of paper (either 200, 250 or 300 gsm).

 

According to him creating art is not that difficult or complex. Art comes in all shapes, sizes and colours and everyone can do something or the other. All one needs to do is make some time for it. He feels that while everyone is trying to chase the orthodox careers, kids are made to believe from a young age that they must pursue to be successful and most of them give up on their passions (which 99% of the time is some form of art). He says that one doesn’t necessarily have to spend multiple hours in a day dedicated to creating the chosen form of art, just sometimes every day can help one discover where true talent lies. He also stresses the fact that learning is something that one must never stop.

Words by Laveena Behl

 

Images by ©Aaditya Singh

Follow Aaditya: Instagram 

 

“Inspiro India will be featuring bloggers every week irrespective of what they blog. To get featured on Inspiro India simply use ‘#iiblogger’ on Instagram ”

 

Check out latest edition of Inspiro India magazine – here

 

 

Submit your work for upcoming issue of Inspiro India Magazine

 

By

Inspiro India

Blog | Inspiration

4 December 2017

iidailyinspiration #148

Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as ‘iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#147

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 


©Credit

 


©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

 

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#146

Submit your work for upcoming issue of Inspiro India Magazine
By

Inspiro India Official

Blog | Travel

2 December 2017

Exotic visual tour of Indian marvels | India in Pictures #002

India is a country where various dynasties have conquered and vanished through the centuries, but the beauty still remains in the form of architecture, food and people themselves!

Cultures, traditions, celebrations and manifolds of landscapes make every corner turn into a new discovery, be it a local or visitor!

Here is a series of visuals by Creative Heads from all over the country.

 

Banke Bihari Temple, Vrindavan // ©Ankit Kumar

 

Nandgaon, Uttar Pradesh // ©Mohit Tejpal

 

Dal Lake, Srinagar // ©Nissar Rafiquee

 

CST, Mumbai // ©Yash Sheth

 

Sam Dunes Jaisalmer // ©Tanvi Sharma

 

Pahalgam, Jammu & Kashmir // ©Manali Jain

 

Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh  // ©Abhishek Kumar Singh

 

Bhabha Valley, Kinnaur // ©Ashish

 

Kochi // ©Ravinder Singh

 

Munnar, Kerala // ©Rejish

 

 

Featuring series of inspiring images by Creative Heads from all over the country as ‘India in Pictures’.

 

Rules to submit for ‘India in Pictures’ here .

 

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#147

Submit your work for upcoming issue of Inspiro India Magazine
By

Inspiro India Official

Blog | Inspiration

1 December 2017

iidailyinspiration #147

Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as ‘iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#146

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

 

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#145

Submit your work for upcoming issue of Inspiro India Magazine
By

Inspiro India Official

Blog | Inspiration

30 November 2017

iidailyinspiration #146

Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as ‘iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#145

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

 

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#144

Submit your work for upcoming issue of Inspiro India Magazine
By

Inspiro India Official

Blog | Inspiration

27 November 2017

iidailyinspiration #145

Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as ‘iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#144

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

 

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#143

Submit your work for upcoming issue of Inspiro India Magazine
By

Inspiro India Official

Blog | Inspiration

24 November 2017

iidailyinspiration #144

Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as ‘iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#143

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

©Credit

 

Featuring series of inspiring images by creative heads from all over the world every day as iidailyinspiration’.

To contribute, send your work at info@inspiroindia.com along with subject: ‘iidailyinspiration’, your name and location.

Eg. Subject:- iidailyinspiration+name+location

 

Check out our previous series of inspiring images here – iidailyinspiration#142

Submit your work for upcoming issue of Inspiro India Magazine
By

Inspiro India Official

Art | Blog | Inspiration

23 November 2017

Interview with Visual Artist: Pardeep Verma

Meet Pardeep Verma, an abstract painter and visual artist

Pardeep Verma

 

Inspiro India: How did you get started? What first got you into Art? Tell us a bit about yourself.

– I once had the opportunity to attend a painting exhibition by Sh. JR. Yadava. Until then I had never imagined that paintings could be handmade. His paintings piqued my interest to do something about it and I requested Sh. Yadava to guide me. He showed me the path and that’s how the journey started.

 

Inspiro India: How would you best describe your style of Visual Art? And the challenges you faced as an artist?

– My visual art style is Abstract. The main challenge I faced was to do the paintings in acrylic colour rather than in watercolour. There were lots of experiments that I had to conduct with ‘n’ number of permutations and combinations before I could get the results I had always dreamt of.

 

 

Inspiro India: What are the tools you couldn’t live without? Can you please explain about your work process?

– I can’t imagine a life without papers, colours and solitude. The combination of the three things gives shape to my imaginations and dreams.

 

Inspiro India: Is studying design in college worth the cost or do you recommend an alternative?

– Studying art essentially helps one acquire the basic skills and that becomes a launch pad. When I was young, my main motive was to start earning a livelihood because art as a field was looked down upon something which never pays. Also in addition to the college education, I believe, having a mentor is of great help. Having said that, the motivation must come from within along with zeal, enthusiasm and energy besides tonnes of practice.

 

Inspiro India: Who/What has been the biggest influence on your way of thinking?

– Whenever I saw somebody getting clicked himself/herself with the creator or the creation – painting, photographer or sculpture in any form – that influenced my thinking. I wanted my creations to be appreciated the same way.

 

Inspiro India: What did you want to become as child?

– As a child, I wanted to have my own identity and excel in any endeavour I selected.

 

Paintings by ©Pardeep Verma

 

Inspiro India: What advice would the artist inside you like to pass on to our readers?

– My advice to an artist will be to think out of the box, be creative and experiment a lot as well as have patience and perseverance till they achieve what you they’ve dreamt of. An artist should always on the lookout for new horizons, new vistas, new worlds.

 

Check out his full feature in May’17 Edition of Inspiro India Magazine issue#38 – Download Free.

 

 

Submit your work for upcoming issue of Inspiro India Magazine